Scott's Photographica Collection

Expo Camera Company
Watch Camera

 

Expo Watch Camera

Expo Watch Camera

Designed to be small, easily carried and mistaken as a pocket watch, the Expo Watch camera was a popular novelty, or disguised camera, of the early 1900s.  The camera measures 2 1/8 x 7/8 inches and weighs 2 3/4 ounces.  The Expo camera was available for over 3 decades.  It was introduced in the United States in 1905 and offered for sale as late as 1939. 

This view shows the "watch winding stem" which is actually the camera's lens mount.  Right of, and above the stem, a round button protrudes from the side of the casing.  This is the shutter release.  A slot with a protruding metal tab can be seen further right and mid-body in this photo.  Pulled half-way along the slot, the tab opens the shutter for time exposures.  Pulling the tab fully along the slot arms the shutter for instantaneous shots.

 

Expo Camera Top Cover

Expo Camera Top Cover

This view shows the EXPO monogram engraved in the camera's cover.  The lens cap, shown covering the tip of the winding stem in this image, serves to protect the lens, is used to regulate time exposures, caps the shutter while arming and adds to the pocket watch deception.  The Expo shutter is not self-capping, meaning that arming the shutter exposes the film.  Thus, it was necessary to keep the cap on the stem until the shutter was armed.  Once the shutter was armed, the cap could be removed and the shutter release pressed to make the exposure.  

The triangular object to the left of the stem is the clip-on accessory reflex viewfinder.  Expo advertising mentions that a viewfinder is not necessary - you can just point and shoot.  The viewfinder was sold separately from the camera.  The curved strip of metal at the back of the housing is a lever used to pry open the top cover for film loading. 

 

Expo Camera Bottom Cover

Expo Camera Bottom Cover

This bottom view (or top depending on your preference) shows the film wind key.  The square cut-out to the left of the key is the film counter window.  The film counter is numbered to 25. 

 

Expo Camera Interior

Expo Camera Interior

Loading the Expo was a simple process.  Simply drop in the daylight loading cartridge and replace the cover.  An Expo cartridge provided twenty five 5/8 x 7/8 inch exposures.

 

Expo Camera Outfit

Expo Camera Outfit

Shown are the Expo instruction manual, box, brilliant reflex viewfinder and Expo in its cloth pouch.  At one time a chain attached the lens cap to the winding stem ring but it is now lost.  This example may date to ca 1912 as the instruction manual includes an advertisement for the newly introduced Expo Police camera, patented 1911.   

 

Expo Instruction Manual

Expo Instructions Front Cover

The address of the Expo Camera Company is shown as 256 W. 23rd St., New York.

 

Expo Instruction Manual

Expo Instructions Back Cover

Various accessories were offered for the Expo camera.  This is an advertisement for the Expo Enlarger, price 1 dollar and 50 cents.  The manual gives the price of the camera as 2 dollars and 50 cents.  A film cartridge was 25 cents. 

 

Expo Instruction Manual

Expo Instructions Inside Cover

Two versions of the accessory viewfinder were available.  The Model A offered ground glass viewing and cost 50 cents.  Model B is a brilliant viewfinder, priced at 75 cents.

 

The 1907 Advanced Watch Camera That Was Never Made

 

Magnus Niéll 1907 Patent Drawing

Portion of 1907 Advanced Model Drawing

In 1907 Magnus Niéll, the inventor of the Expo Watch camera, filed a patent application for a radically different watch camera design.  The patent was granted in 1908.  The title of the patent is Vest-Pocket Camera, and in his patent description, Mr. Niéll explains that this design is an improvement over earlier vest-pocket cameras made to resemble a watch.  The patent is interesting to read.

Among other changes and improvements, the camera features a built-in folding reflex viewfinder.  This is a creative and stylish encore to the original Expo design.  I've never located an example of this camera, and although I am certain it was not produced, if you happen to own one... I want it!

Magnus Niéll, a citizen of Sweden and resident of New York City, was a creative engineer who focused on the design of small, compact cameras.  Two other Niéll designs are featured on this site.  These are the Houghton Ensignette and Ensign Midget cameras.

Additional Information

 

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This page was updated April 3, 2002